UNDER CONSTRUCTION. STANISLAUS COUNTY IS AVAILABLE A TREATMENT THAT CAN HELP PEOPLE. >> HOW IT WORKS. >> THIS MEDICINE, DR. ELAINE SORIANO SAYS HE HAS BEEN A HELP TO RELIEVE THE PRESSURE OF OUR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM. >> THEY WILL BE LESS SICK IN THE HOSPITAL. LESS PATIENTS AND LESS FAMILY DAMAGE. >> TREATMENT IS MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY THERAPY THAT REDUCES HOSPITALISM, COMPLICATIONS, AND THE RISK OF DEATH, COVID-19. 78 YEAR OLD DOL TONY – RECEIVED TREATMENT THIS SPRING. >> I FEELED GOOD. I THOUGHT I WAS DOING SOMETHING. MY FAMILY. – AND MY FAMILY. THAT MAY FEEL EVEN BETTER. >> DRUGS ARE FREE AT LEAST FOR THOSE WHO ARE IN A RISK STATE, TONY ” IS THE AGE OF THE CASE. >> OTHERS WILL HAVE DIABETES, HYPERTENSION, HIGH STRESS, HEART DISEASE AND CANCER. >> POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS HAVE FLULIKE SYMPTOMS, DISEASE, NEED AND LOW PRESSURE. >> NO SIDE EFFECTS. NOTHING. HE SAID STAYING AT HOME. >> TYON SAYS IT’S HARD AND REQUESTED AND INTENDS TO SPEND TIME WITH HIS WIFE AND GRANDCHILDREN. >> I FEEL FROM THERE AND I AM HAPPY TO BE WITH MY FAMILY. >> FREE TREATMENT IS OFFERED TO ALL PEOPLE AT HIGH RISK. IT IS A HALF-HOUR TREATMENT AND THE PATIENT RECEIVES FOUR PLANTATIONS

Stanislaus County Clinic Uses Antibody Treatment for High-Risk Patients with COVID-19

As the state of California prepares for another possible winter hike, a Stanislaus County clinic is using a special form of therapy to treat patients with COVID-19. About 4,000 people are hospitalized with the virus, according to the California Department of Public Health, and that number shows no sign of a steady decline at the moment. The Golden Valley Health Center is using a treatment known as monoclonal antibody therapy for patients at high risk for cancer, diabetes, hypertension, hypertension, or heart disease. Another risk factor is age. A medication known as Regen-Cov can also help prevent hospitalization, serious complications, and death for patients. One such patient, 78-year-old Tony Santillan, received treatment last spring after testing positive for COVID-19. “I felt good because I thought I was doing something for myself and my family, you know. Maybe that made me feel better, “Santillan said. Tony said he had no side effects, and recovered from COVID-19 with great ease.” I never got sick, but my face was a little swollen. and then it disappeared, “the grandfather said. At the time, the drug was intravenous, meaning patients received 1.5-hour monoclonal antibody therapy. It also contained Bamlanivimab, which was later shown to be ineffective against COVID-19 variants. , and as a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration revoked the use authorization.A month later, manufacturers added 300 milligrams of etesevimab antibody to the drug.Combined with 300 milligrams of bamlanivimab, Dr. Elaine Soriano said the drug tested well against her co-treatment with F and COVID-19. a stronger and newer version was approved for emergency use in September.Treatment is now also given in four shots, according to the GVHC.Patients can choose to give shots in each leg and arm or in the stomach area.The process has been shortened from 90 minutes to half an hour.Dr. ago material ge taking into account that antibodies are produced in laboratories. Dr. Soriano is optimistic that the drug can help stimulate more high-risk patients and relieve stress in our health care system. “There will be fewer patients in the hospital. There will be fewer patients at the ICU, and fewer families who are tragically affected, “said Dr. Soriano. Possible side effects include flu-like symptoms, nausea, diarrhea, and low blood pressure. Patients are advised to get vaccinated after treatment. prevention is so prevention is still the best option, ”Dr. Soriano said.

As the state of California prepares for another possible winter hike, a Stanislaus County clinic is using a special form of therapy to treat patients with COVID-19.

About 4,000 people are hospitalized with the virus, according to the California Department of Public Health, and that number shows no sign of a steady decline at the moment. The Golden Valley Health Center is using a treatment known as monoclonal antibody therapy for patients at high risk for cancer, diabetes, hypertension, hypertension, or heart disease. Another risk factor is age.

A medication known as Regen-Cov can also help prevent hospitalization, serious complications, and death for patients. One such patient, 78-year-old Tony Santillan, received treatment last spring after testing positive for COVID-19.

“I felt good because I thought I was doing something for myself and my family, you know. Maybe that made me feel better, ”Santillan said.

Tony said it had no side effects, and recovered from COVID-19 with great ease.

“I never got sick, but my face was a little swollen and then it disappeared,” Grandpa said.

At the time, the drug was intravenous, meaning that patients received monoclonal antibody therapy for 1.5 hours. It also contained Bamlanivimab, which was later shown to be ineffective against COVID-19 variants, and as a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration revoked its use authorization.

A month later, the manufacturers added 300 milligrams of etesevimab antibody to the drug. Combined with 300 milligrams of bamlanivimab, Dr. Elaine Soriano said she tested the drug well against COVID-19 and its variants.

The FDA approved a more powerful and newer version of the therapy for use in emergencies in September. Treatment is now also given through four shots, according to the GVHC. The patient may choose to give the shot to each leg and arm or to the stomach area. The process has also been shortened from 90 minutes to half an hour. Dr. Soriano added that the treatment does not involve genetic material, as the antibodies are produced in laboratories.

At least another 20 GVHC patients have been treated with monoclonal antibody therapy. Dr. Soriano is optimistic that the drug can help recover more high-risk patients and relieve stress in our health care system.

“There will be fewer patients in the hospital. There will be fewer patients in the ICU, and fewer tragically affected families, ”Dr. Soriano said.

Monoclonal antibody therapy is offered free of charge to patients over 18 years of age and to all high-risk individuals, not just GVHC patients. It is only offered to patients with mild symptoms. Potential side effects include flu-like symptoms, nausea, diarrhea, and low blood pressure. Once the patient has received treatment, doctors recommend that they be vaccinated.

Dr. Soriano explained that monoclonal antibody therapy is an excellent treatment, but the best comprehensive step is prevention.

“The vaccine is a prevention of COVID-19, so prevention is still the best option,” Dr. Soriano said.

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